Hotel:Albion Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

314 Smith Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Albion Hotel (2023 - present)

Previous Name(s):

Albion Hotel (1874/75 - 1989); Albion Inn (c.1990 - c.1995); Punters Palace (c. 1995 - c. 2021); Perry's Refreshment Club (2022 - 2023))

When Built/Licenced:

1874

When Delicensed:

N/A

Status of Building:

Existing hotel

Rebuilt/Altered:

N/A

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

Part C, p. 569, p. 586

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

Volume 3, Appendix B, individually listed under precinct

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

Individually significant within HO333

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N ; Hodgkinson 1858: N ; MMBW: Detail Plan 1196, 1900

Comments:

On a corner site with a notable richly-decorated design including decorative use of grapes and vine leaves, the hotel was built for Patrick Coyle who had previously owned a house on the site and was the publican at the Grace Darling Hotel. The first licensee was Patrick Devern.
After some years as the slightly insalubrious 'Punters Palace', it was purchased by local brewer Bodriggy who renovated it in 2021 and 2022 and gave it a brief life as a 'refreshment club' before thankfully reinstating its original name.

Hotel:Alliance Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

Northwest corner Cambridge and Derby Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Alliance Hotel (1869 - 1871)

Previous Name(s):

N/A

When Built/Licenced:

1869

When Delicensed:

1871

Status of Building:

Demolished between 1872 and 1889. Corner shop now on site has date 1889 on pediment.

Rebuilt/Altered:

N/A

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

N/A

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

N/A

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

N/A

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N; Hodgkinson 1858: N ; MMBW: N/A

Comments:

In The Argus of 4 December 1869, the publican advertised that he wanted to purchase 'a good second-hand beer-engine'. (p. 7)

Hotel:Ayrshire Arms Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

52A Palmer Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Ayrshire Arms Hotel (1871 - 1908)

Previous Name(s):

N/A

When Built/Licenced:

1871

When Delicensed:

1908

Status of Building:

residence

Rebuilt/Altered:

Corner doorway bricked up, later window added facing Perry Street

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

Part B, pp. 430-431

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

N/A

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

Contributory to HO324

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N ; Hodgkinson 1858: N ; MMBW: Detail Plan 1197 & 1198, 1899.

Comments:

There are a number of large and ornate hotels in Collingwood; this small mid-Victorian hotel is at the other end of the spectrum. Its restrained architectural details, size, and location in a minor street are indicative of a type of hotel serving a localised clientele, probably in humble circumstances. Most hotels of this type were de-licensed in the early twentieth century, and many were demolished. That this one remains is a lucky chance for us to gain some insight into a past lifestyle.

At the Licenses Reduction Board hearing in 1908

Arthur Darby, licensee, said he had a fair class of customers amongst the labouring classes. Very few of the 'belltopper gentlemen' came to his hotel. He denied that the hotel was damp. In reply to Inspector Dungey, witness said he had done some Sunday trading, but a few Sundays ago Constable Roxby visited the hotel and gave him a scare. Since then he had not done any but had taken a position as driver for a cordial manufacturer, so as to make up for the loss which he was sustaining through abstaining from Sunday trading.
The Argus, 28 February 1908. p. 9

Shortly after giving up its licence, the hotel was auctioned with the following description: 'Delicensed hotel... very substantial, brick, slated, one-storey building, 9 rooms; in good repair; now let at 2 pounds weekly... well-adapted for business and residence.' ( The Argus, 23 December 1908, p.2)

Hotel:Baden Powell Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

61 Victoria Parade
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Baden Powell Hotel (1900 to c. 2021)

Previous Name(s):

New Bendigo Hotel (1872 - 1899)

When Built/Licenced:

1872

When Delicensed:

N/A

Status of Building:

Hotel not operating since c. 2021

Rebuilt/Altered:

Renovated during the inter-war period in the Moderne style; windows later altered

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

Part C, pp. 633-634

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

N/A

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

Contributory to HO 336

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N ; Hodgkinson 1858: N ; MMBW: Detail Plan 1197 & 1198, 1899.

Comments:

Almost the first publican was Yorkshireman Joseph Brownhill, who was at the helm from 1873 until his death in 1891, when, in a common pattern for publicans, his wife Fanny took over. Brownhill had previously been licensee at the Norfolk Hotel in Easey Street.

The name of this hotel was changed in 1900 to commemorate Robert Baden Powell. During the Second Boer War, Baden-Powell became a national hero for his role in the Siege of Mafeking, 1899-1900, the most famous British action in the Second Boer War.

In the late 1920s and 1930s the Moderne style swept Melbourne, and the Baden Powell was one of many Collingwood hotels to be altered. The hotel was renovated again in 2008-2009; with the exception of enlarged ground floor windows, the exterior has not greatly changed. However, an application in 2022 for an eight-storey building to be constructed on the site included a proposal to return the hotel building to its previous Victorian appearance and original name. The planning application was refused by VCAT because it exceeded the recommended six-storey height limit for the area, but the fate of the hotel remains in limbo.

Hotel:Barnard's Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

32 Peel Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Barnard's Hotel (1869 - 1914)

Previous Name(s):

In 1871 Barnard applied to change the name to Barnard's Family Hotel, but there is no indication that this was put into effect.

When Built/Licenced:

1869

When Delicensed:

1914

Status of Building:

Commercial premises

Rebuilt/Altered:

N/A

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

Part B, pp. 454-455

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

Volume 3, Appendix B, individually listed within precinct

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

Individually significant within HO318

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N ; Hodgkinson 1858: N ; MMBW: Detail Plan 1201, 1899

Comments:

William Barnard, a baker, owned a three-roomed timber shop on this site in 1868. The following year he built three brick shops, the corner one of which became the hotel. Barnard was the licensed victualler for many years, and also continued to conduct his business as a baker, pastrycook and confectioner until his death at the age of 74 in 1902. Barnard's probate documents include a detailed list of all the contents, ranging from the bakery cart and horse, to jars of jam, from bottles of liquor to numbers of glasses. The hotel and shops were bequeathed to his housekeeper Ann Dougherty, who shortly afterwards married James Condon. The couple continued the hotel and bakery businesses until the hotel was closed by the Licenses Reduction Board in 1914.

The hotel and adjacent shops form a pleasing example of bi-chrome brickwork. This is a building style for which the Collingwood Slope is noted, used in buildings ranging from the towering Yorkshire Brewery to small cottages.

Hotel:Bell Inn

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

Perry Street, outhwest corner Palmer Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Bell Inn (1860 - 1871)

Previous Name(s):

N/A

When Built/Licenced:

1860

When Delicensed:

1871

Status of Building:

Demolished before 1899

Rebuilt/Altered:

N/A

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

N/A

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

N/A

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

N/A

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N ; Hodgkinson 1858: N ; MMBW: N/A

Comments:

Brick building with 11 rooms (Rate Book 1867). Not long after opening the Bell Inn was embroiled in a public controversy, played out in the East Collingwood courthouse and the pages of The Argus.

GUARDIANS OF THE PUBLIC MORALS

To the Editor of The Argus

Sir, _ As the police force are paid by the public for performing certain duties, I think it is but right that those duties should be performed in a manner quite different from the following.

On the evening of 2nd instant a sergeant and constable (both on duty) were drinking at the bar of the Bell Inn, Perry-street, East Collingwood, for upwards of two hours. The constable was afterwards carried home drunk by his wife, and had been previously seen rolling drunk in the public street with the landlord of the hotel.

AN OBSERVER

( The Argus, 9 July 1860, p. 5)

Landlord Samuel Colls responded angrily in print the following day, denying these allegations. The case against sergeant James Burns and constable Philip Meade was heard in court in what was described by The Argus as a 'peculiar and important case' and reported in great detail the following day. The charges were dismissed. ( The Argus 25 July 1860, p. 7).

Hotel:Bendigo Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

125 Johnston Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Bendigo Hotel (1888 - 2024)

Previous Name(s):

Collingwood Arms Hotel (1871-1887)

When Built/Licenced:

1871

When Delicensed:

N/A

Status of Building:

Hotel ceased operating March 2024

Rebuilt/Altered:

Demolished and rebuilt 1911

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

Part A, pp. 282-284

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

Volume 3, Appendix B, individually listed within precinct

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

Individually significant within HO 324

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N ; Hodgkinson 1858: N ; MMBW: 1236, 1197 & 1198, 1899 (Note wrongly labelled Bedford Hotel)

Comments:

The original two-storey corner hotel known as the Collingwood Arms and built in decorative Victorian style was purchased by Carlton Brewery in 1887 and renamed the Bendigo. In 1911, after purchasing the neighbouring shop to increase the exposure to Johnston Street, they demolished the old pub and replaced it with the current building. This was built in an Art Nouveau influenced style, designed by the prominent architecture firm Sydney Smith and Ogg.

An excellent photograph taken by Wolfgang Sievers in 1964 shows the distinctive 1911 style as it was meant to look. By the time John T Collins photographed the building in the early 1980s, paintwork had obscured the distinctive red brick and cement exterior but the overall design with two corner towers remains very striking.

A popular music venue for 14 years, known for its heavy metal gigs, the Bendigo finally closed in 2024, succumbing to the fate of a number of icons of Melbourne's live music scene which have found the financial burden too heavy.

Hotel:Beresford Arms Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

Langridge Street, northeast corner Rokeby Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Beresford Arms Hotel (1868 - 1908)

Previous Name(s):

N/A

When Built/Licenced:

18681908

When Delicensed:

N/A

Status of Building:

n/A

Rebuilt/Altered:

N/A

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

N/A

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

N/A

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

N/A

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N ; Hodgkinson 1858: N ; MMBW: Detail Plan 1201, 1899

Comments:

The hotel opened in 1868 with a bar, two sitting rooms and three bedrooms. Local drinkers were well-served, as the Lord Nelson was already situated on the southeast corner of the intersection. It was closed by a ruling of the Licenses Reduction Board in 1908, when it was described as a very old, dilapidated, one-storey wooden structure, very poorly furnished. Constable Carlin stated that during the last seven years the hotel had been noted for trading in prohibited hours. Whenever he approached the place on Sundays, a number of men round about it scurried away, and it was common to see people coming through holes in the fence which enclosed a vacant piece of land adjoining the hotel. Another deposition described the Beresford Arms as 'the meeting place of undesirable characters, particularly after dark and on Sundays'. ( The Argus, 19 February 1908, p. 4)

It was hardly surprising, after such evidence, that the hotel was ordered to be closed.

Hotel:Brandon Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

84 Smith Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Brandon Hotel (1897 - 1914)

Previous Name(s):

City of Norwich Hotel (1865 - 1867), Gray's Hotel (1868 - 1872), London Hotel (1873 - 1880), Our Boys Hotel (1880), Flying Squadron Hotel (1881 - 1896)

When Built/Licenced:

1865

When Delicensed:

1914

Status of Building:

Commercial premises

Rebuilt/Altered:

1870s?

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

N/A

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

N/A

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

Contributory to HO333

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N/A ; Hodgkinson 1858: N/A ; MMBW: Detail Plan 1208, 1899

Comments:

The 1867 rate book describes this as a six-roomed brick hotel, conducted by Mary Ann Tonkin. The existing building is certainly the same one that was there in the 1880s, but seems likely to have been re-built, perhaps in the early 1870s, as it is now one of a very similar group of shops which replaced shops which in 1867 were of timber construction.

The hotel changed publicans even more frequently than it changed its name. Luckily William Cuffley was there for long enough to have a photo taken for posterity. By 1883 Cuffley, who had operated a number of hotels around Melbourne and from 1878 until 1882 had been licensee at Steeth's Family Hotel in Wellington Street, was ensconced at the Flying Squadron where he stayed for four years. Family reminiscence has him as a kind and jovial sort of fellow - well suited to the role of publican. Alongside William and his wife in the photograph dating from the mid 1880s is his niece Emma Rosina Evans, whom he had taken in after she was widowed. The name of the hotel at this time refers to a British naval squadron.

Hotel:Bristol and Bath Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

66 Cromwell Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Bristol and Bath Hotel (1869 - 1908)

Previous Name(s):

N/A

When Built/Licenced:

1869

When Delicensed:

1908

Status of Building:

Streat (restaurant and cafe)

Rebuilt/Altered:

c. 1879

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

N/A

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

Volume 2, Building Citations, Part 1, pp. 101-102

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

HO 97 individually significant

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N ; Hodgkinson: 1858: N ; MMBW map: Detail Plan 1210, 1899 (named Bath Hotel)

Comments:

A stone hotel was on this site from at least 1869, but was re-built at some stage, possibly around 1879 (as evidenced by an increase in rateable value). In 1903 it was acquired by the Shamrock Brewery and in 1908 by Carlton & United Breweries. After de-licensing it became a residence, and later a boutique bordello.

The building is of local architectural significance, a free standing two storey symmetrical Italianate brick building with restrained decoration. It is particularly noteworthy nowadays that most surrounding nineteenth century housing has been demolished, leaving it standing in the midst of unprepossessing twentieth century industrial development as a testament to a lifestyle long gone.