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Collingwood Hotels Database search

Use the fields below to search our Collingwood Hotels database. It contains all the hotels in the Collingwood, Clifton Hill and Abbotsford areas.

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Hotel:Wellington Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

Wellington Street, west side, south of Derby Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Wellington Hotel (1905 - 1908)

Previous Name(s):

Lady Franklin Hotel (1861-1899), Hobart Club Hotel (1900-1904)

When Built/Licenced:

1861

When Delicensed:

1908

Status of Building:

Demolished

Rebuilt/Altered:

N/A

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

N/A

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

N/A

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

N/A

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N/A ; Hodgkinson 1858: N/A ; MMBW: Detail Plan 1208, 1899

Comments:

A brick hotel with 13 rooms (Rate Book 1867). Lady Franklin was the wife of Sir John Franklin, Governor of Tasmania from 1836 to 1843. An active, cultured woman who interested herself in charitable works and cultural improvement, she also organised many search parties to the Arctic after her husband's 1845 exploratory expedition failed to return.

Would the owners have changed the name to the Wellington if they had known that an earlier hotel of that name a few blocks to the north had been closed in disgrace in 1885? (See Hotel # 91)

Hotel:Wellington Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

Wellington Street, east side, south of Perry Street, variously numbered 214/282 Wellington Street during the hotel's existence
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Wellington Hotel (1862 - 1885)

Previous Name(s):

Baker's Arms (1861)

When Built/Licenced:

1861

When Delicensed:

1885

Status of Building:

Demolished

Rebuilt/Altered:

N/A

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

N/A

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

N/A

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

N/A

Maps:

Kearney 1855: N ; Hodgkinson 1858: N ; MMBW: N/A

Comments:

A brick hotel with 11 rooms (Rate Book 1864 &1870), an early owner was Samuel Ramsden, a quarryman who was a councillor in 1857-59. The hotel was started by baker James Mason, who sold his bread from the hotel until the building of his neighbouring baker's shop was completed. ( The Argus, 9 February, 1861, p .6). Its location is now part of the site of the Wellington Street Housing Commission high rise flats.

It was not just customers who drank too much and got into fights. On this occasion it was the publican who was charged with assault:

'Michael Donellan of the Wellington Hotel, Wellington-st is charged with assaulting John McGlone. The complainant was drinking in the hotel and having got intoxicated went outside to fight with the defendant, when the latter struck him a severe blow to the face with a lemonade bottle, which he had taken from the bar. The Bench thought that, considering the defendant's position as a publican, the justice of the case would not be met by the infliction of a fine, and accordingly sentenced him to a month's imprisonment at the same time ordering him to pay 2/15/6 pounds costs.'

( The Argus, 12/10/1870)

More serious problems arose in 1884 when Thomas May attempted to renew his licence. No fewer than four lawyers appeared in the crowded court, as a large number of residents had signed a petition to have the place closed. Senior Constable Lineham described the Wellington as 'a most infamous house, a common brothel'. He had also seen 'a woman who was not a prostitute taken to the house by a flash young man. They both went upstairs and remained there for some time'. Grocer Alfred Webber opined that the hotel was frequented by persons of the 'most disreputable class'. The general feeling was that, with three respectable hotels in the vicinity, a school and two churches opposite, and the Salvation Army Barracks just up the road, it would be a blessing if the hotel closed. The Bench agreed. Another application was made in January 1885 by Alfred Leahy, but again refused.

Hotel:Willow Tree Hotel

Suburb:Collingwood

Hotel Address:

79 Vere Street, southwest corner Cromwell Street
Collingwood 3066
Australia
Map It

Most Recent Name:

Willow Tree Hotel (c.1856 - 1936)

Previous Name(s):

Leeds Arms Hotel (1854 - c.1855)

When Built/Licenced:

1854

When Delicensed:

December 1936

Status of Building:

Demolished between 1936 and 1989

Rebuilt/Altered:

N/A

Heritage Victoria Register:

N/A

National Trust Register:

N/A

Collingwood Conservation Study 1989 & 1995:

N/A

City of Yarra Heritage Review 1998:

N/A

City of Yarra Review of Heritage Overlay Areas, 2007 & Heritage Database:

N/A

Maps:

Kearney 1855: Y ; Hodgkinson 1858: Y ; MMBW: Detail Plan 1199 & 1200, 1899

Comments:

This was a stone hotel with fifteen rooms (Rate Book 1864, 1870). A distant view of the two-storey building can be seen in a photograph taken from the town hall around 1887.

An early publican was Charles Swift who, in a typical pattern in Collingwood, forwarded his political ambitions through local networks. Election meetings were held at the hotel, and the fourth Oddfellow's Lodge to be established in Collingwood (in 1858) met at the Willow Tree. Swift was a lodge official, as was George David Langridge, and both men became councillors in 1865. Langridge went on to enter parliament in 1875. After Swift's death in 1870, Mrs Anne Swift ran the hotel until the mid 1880s.

At the other end of the spectrum, Collingwood Town Clerk Mr Moody requested dairymen of East Collingwood to attend a public meeting at the Willow Tree in October 1860.

It was closed by an April 1936 determination of the Licensing Court, along with the Council Club Hotel in Johnston Street. The Court stated that the district was one of the most densely populated industrial centres in the State and had a large daily influx of workers but the evidence showed that the hotel accommodation for the supply of meals and beds, as well as the number of licences, was in excess of present-day demands. The Court added that sittings to deal with claims for compensation would be held as promptly as possible and owners and licensees were asked to submit their claims early. ( The Argus 21 April 1936, p. 11)

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